Personal Innovation

One of the books on my summer reading list was The Other Side of Innovation by Vijay Govindarajan and Chris Trimble. The authors analyzed multiple organizations in an effort to study why innovations succeeded or failed. I thought this would be timely reading material in light of the Academy beginning a new strategic planning cycle, and with it, potentially new and innovative ideas that might be developed. However, the more I read, the more I realized that the successful processes of innovation the authors described could be applied to students’ learning, as well. I shared the following thoughts with the faculty and staff during our professional days in August.

Govindarajan and Trimble developed the simple formulas: Innovation = Ideas + Process; and Process = Leader + Team + Plan. They also devoted many pages of their book to the role of a dedicated team of people who need to be assigned to innovative, non-routine tasks. This team is most effective when its members work collaboratively and in coordination with others who continue to perform the routine tasks of the organization. The authors explain that this necessary partnership creates sustainable innovation through a single organizational plan. Hence, innovation requires adequate resources, and also needs to somehow coordinate with the status quo – the day-to-day business at hand.

Adapting this model to an individuals’ sense of balance between innovation and the daily routine, one must be able to set aside time and other personal resources to innovate, while at the same time, continue with daily responsibilities, tasks, and demands. Harry Kraemer, in his TedTalk on leadership comments that daily self-reflection is critical to understanding the difference between our activity and our productivity. He poses the question, “We can be busy multi-tasking all day, but has all the activity produced the results that matter and that we value?” So, it might be that the first step to personal innovation is to assess the value of all the activities in which we are currently engaged to determine if we can eliminate any or be more efficient about them so that we have time to be innovative.

Govindarajan and Trimble suggest running a disciplined experiment to determine the success of our innovation or an enhanced productivity. They suggest documenting a single, clear hypothesis, then determine what can be learned from the outcomes. For example, if the end results are low outcomes, are they a result of poor execution or too high predictions indicating potentially poor assumptions? In other words, accountability in some measurable way is an essential and valuable piece of the innovation process that is made up of three components: Results = Did you deliver? Actions = Did you execute? and Learning = Did you follow a rigorous learning process?

If there was a time for an innovative spirit to take hold to rebuild communities and individuals’ lives, it is now. In the last few weeks, the natural disasters around the globe and particularly in the Caribbean, Texas, and Florida seem overwhelming. Along with the stories of devastation are stories of hope, compassion, and heroism. It seems that at the darkest moments, the human spirit triumphs. In the last few days, students, parents, and other members of the Archmere community have been organizing responses to help those affected by these tragic events. While we sometimes feel helpless and inadequate in responding to victims’ immediate needs, we, as a faith community, can immediately offer our prayers. And organized prayer can be very powerful. I ask you to commit to daily prayer particularly for the people affected by the hurricanes.

As we begin a new school year, perhaps preoccupied with nature’s catastrophic events, may we all use our time together to be innovative, and in doing so become better persons who are more self-aware of our place in the world, enjoying the work we are called to do in response to the needs of those around us.

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