Roused by God

Today’s Word:

“The Lord God has given me a well-trained tongue, that I might know how to speak to the weary a word that will rouse them” (Isaiah 50:4)


On This Date…
O
n March 23, 2008, Easter Sunday, at 9:44 AM, Abbot John Neitzel, O.Praem., the first abbot of Daylesford Abbey (1963-1989) died at Daylesford of cancer on his 84th birthday. During his final illness of he expressed a desire to die on Easter, and his last birthday was the only birthday of his life to fall outside of Lent. Abbot Neitzel was a high school teacher of Latin and English, Principal of Bishop Neumann High School in Philadelphia, and, after retiring as abbot,  pastor in Dauphin, PA. Abbot Neitzel was the first chairperson (1980-1989) of Archmere’s Board of Trustees.

At Mass today we heard in the first reading, “The Lord God has given me a well-trained tongue, that I might know how to speak to the weary a word that will rouse them”. God gave Abbot Neitzel the gift of being able to rouse the weary, and on Easter God roused him to newness of life.

– Father McLaughlin

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The Face of Christ

Today’s Word:

“Neither do I condemn you” (John 8:11)


On This Date…

UnknownOn March 13, 2013 Pope Francis was elected on the 5th ballot as the 266th pope, the first pope to choose the name “Francis.” He was born in 1936 in Buenos Aires, Argentina, one of five children. He joined the Jesuits in 1958, was ordained a priest in 1969, and was ordained a bishop in 1992. His motto, as bishop and pope, is “lowly but chosen” (cf. Matthew 9:9-13).

Pope Francis has said, “The name of God is Mercy” and “The face of God is Jesus.” In today’s Gospel Jesus said, “Neither do I condemn you”. Pope Francis has the face of Christ.

– Father McLaughlin

Strength in the Lord

Today’s Word:

Look to the Lord in his strength, seek to serve him constantly” (Psalm 105:4)


On This Date…

Saint Patrick

Saint Patrick

On March 17, 461 AD Saint Patrick died in Ireland at age 76. He was born in Great Britain and was kidnapped at age 16 by Irish raiders, taken to Ireland, and forced into slavery as a shepherd. Enduring hard work and harsh climate, loneliness and poverty, Patrick learned to rely on God in prayer. After six years in captivity, Patrick escaped, made his way to the coast, and sailed for home. Later he has a dream in which he heard the Irish people say to him, “Come back and walk with us once more.” Patrick became a priest and bishop, and returned to Ireland where he spread the Gospel for 30 years, often in great danger, He died at the site of his first church.

On March 17, 1955 Abbot Bernard Pennings, O.Praem. died in Green Bay, Wisconsin at age 93. Like Saint Patrick, Abbot Pennings was a missionary, serving as the leader of American Norbertines from 1893 to 1955. He purchased Archmere from the Raskobs for a high school, attended the dedication, presided at the first graduation, and appointed the first four headmasters.

At Mass today we prayed, “Look to the Lord in his strength, seek to serve him constantly”. Saint Patrick and Abbot Pennings did just that.

– Father McLaughlin